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10 Sports Recovery Hacks That Are Weirder Than Cupping

Horse Placenta

Horse Placenta

Would you pay $3,350 to have a placenta rubbed on your damaged muscles? Probably not, but a Serbian physiotherapist named Marian Kovacevic makes a living rubbing horse placenta on the injured muscles of soccer stars like Robin Van Persie, Frank Lampard, and Glen Johnson.

Vinotherapy

Vinotherapy

New York Knicks basketball star Amar’e Stoudemire has found that a nice relaxing bath of red wine eases his muscles after a hard game. Most of us would probably drink the liquid for the soothing effects, but the warm bath may help to prevent heart disease and cancer as it soaks through the skin ... but the jury is still out on that one.

(Featured image via Instagram; Slide image via Instagram)

Sugar Injections

Sugar Injections

Most health-conscious athletes avoid sugar like the plague, but there are some who inject it straight into their bodies. While we may joke that donuts go straight to our thighs or stomach, professional soccer player Joe Mattock shoots sugar straight into his ankle to speed up recovery. Weird as it is, the treatment is often used by people who suffer from osteoarthritis because it tricks the body into healing itself.

Cheese

Cheese

Sure, eating a block of cheese gives you a boost of vitamins and minerals, so why wouldn’t it work as a recovery technique? Think again. Former FIFA coach Felix Magath encouraged players to strap cheese on their legs for a speedy recovery. Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn also uses this approach by rubbing a soft, Austrian cheese called topfen on her shins. Delicious.

CVAC Sessions

CVAC Sessions

Cyclic Variations in Adaptive Conditioning (CVAC) is a lot more than a phrase you can’t say while drunk. A CVAC pod changes the pressure and oxygen levels to condition your body to use oxygen more efficiently. Additionally, CVAC practitioners claim the technique improves your body’s energy systems by removing toxins and waste from the cells.

(Image via Instagram)

Goat Blood

Goat Blood

If your hamstrings need a little work, why not consider an injection of goat’s blood? Dr. Hans Wilhelm Muller-Wohlfahrt has made this a popular treatment for those who have tight hamstrings. Among his clients is professional soccer player Peter MacDonald, who claims the technique works like a charm.

Leeches

Leeches

Didn’t leeches fall out of popularity as a medical treatment after the medieval ages? Apparently not. These little blood suckers are used by French soccer player Louis Saha to reduce swelling in his knee—which has given him trouble throughout his career. Leeches draw out excess blood and release pressure.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but it’s real. Cryotherapy chambers are designed to chill the outside of an athlete’s skin to an abysmal 30 degrees in as little as 10 seconds. The body sends all its blood to its core and takes away all the pain from extremities by forcing the blood to recirculate.

After stepping out of the chamber, the enriched blood rushes through the body and gives the athlete a nice endorphin rush. Who uses this insane technique? None other than track star Jeremy Wariner—winner of four Olympic medals.

(Featured image via Instagram; Slide image via Instagram)

GyroStim Sessions

GyroStim Sessions

Pittsburgh Penguins NHL star Sidney Crosby swears by the GyroStim, which is a computer-controlled, spinning chair that allegedly stimulates the brain. People are literally strapped into the seat and told to stare at a fixed object while being spun around upside down and side to side. This weird recovery hack isn’t for those with a light stomach.

(Image via Instagram)

Chinese Hamster Ovaries

Chinese Hamster Ovaries

After breaking his thumb, Australian football player Kyle Reimers took a dramatic approach to aid in recovery—Chinese hamster ovaries. Why Chinese? I don’t know. The hamster ovaries apparently have osteogenic protein-1, which is said to accelerate the body's production of bone. I’m sure we’re both making the same disgusted face right now, but the technique apparently cut the usual six-week downtime to only four.