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31 Movies That Make Snowflakes Melt

Blazing Saddles (1974)

Blazing Saddles (1974)

Blazing Saddles is a little iffy. Something like this would have a hard time releasing in our society today, but it needs to be said that Brooks used the offensive scenes as a social commentary of issues plaguing society at the time.

In his defense, Mel Brooks did collaborate with Richard Pryor, who knew it was going to be a hit. Still, we reiterate, this type of film won’t be gracing our silver screens anytime soon.

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Gone with the Wind (1939)

Gone with the Wind (1939)

Gone with the Wind is a classic, but many people see it as unacceptable. There are claims that the film creates a fond nostalgic image of slavery.

At the very opening, the plantation is seen as a pleasant place where Mammy and Prissy exemplify the “Happy Slave” stereotype. 

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Soul Man (1986)

Soul Man (1986)

The general plot of this movie is pretty bad. It’s about a white guy who wants to go to law school but can’t afford it. So, his solution? To wear blackface. He further perpetuates stereotypes, making the movie so much worse.

All of this went down in the '80s when society was supposedly “enlightened” about these issues.

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The Jerk (1979)

The Jerk (1979)

The Jerk is a comedy with Steve Martin, playing a man that believes he was born a poor black child in Mississippi. As you can imagine, the character was…less than racially sensitive.

Steve Martin recently did an interview saying that everyone in the film was “treated with such respect.” Regardless, the movie wouldn’t be remade in the same fashion today.

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Tropic Thunder (2008)

Tropic Thunder (2008)

Funny or not, Tropic Thunder uses blackface for comedy. The character Kirk Lazarus, played by Robert Downey Jr, is supposed to be ridiculous, and other characters call him out for his racist interpretations.

Brandon T. Jackson plays a character that confronts Lazarus’s impersonation of African Americans in the film. Still, it didn’t sit well with some audiences. 

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Revenge of the Nerds (1984)

Revenge of the Nerds (1984)

What could be so bad about this light-hearted comedy? A lot, actually. The nerds aren’t supposed to be the bullies, but they turn out to be pretty horrible when they spy and photogram a bunch of sorority girls nude.

Then, they pass around the pictures later. Nowadays, it’s incredibly offensive and cringy.

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Me, Myself & Irene (2000)

Me, Myself & Irene (2000)

Me, Myself & Irene may not seem that bad at first, but really looking at it will reveal something else. The film is about a guy that has schizophrenia, but the way it’s portrayed is pretty offensive.

It’s a misconception that those who have schizophrenia have multiple personalities, and this film perpetuates that issue. Furthermore, it had taglines like, “from mental to gentle.” Yikes.

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Sixteen Candles (1984)

Sixteen Candles (1984)

Sixteen Candles was an '80s classic, but this is the kind of thing that wouldn’t fly today. In the film, a character’s pants are stolen by another, and he trades his super drunk girlfriend in exchange for his pants. Later, the girl is shown as having her dress bunched up around her thighs with her underwear exposed.

Today, we’d call this date rape. There are other issues in the film including drugging women and the character Long Duk Dong.

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Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991)

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991)

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves wasn’t a stellar movie for several reasons, but if it were made today, it wouldn’t be tolerated. There’s a scene near the end of the film where Robin has to save Maid Marian from the Sheriff.

That scene was supposed to be “funny" as he attempted to rape Marian right at the altar. In the 90s, you'd think society would understand that rape isn't comedic.

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I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2000)

I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2000)

I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry is about two straight guys who decide to marry each other so one of their children can receive healthcare.

Not only is it insurance fraud, but it’s also incredibly offensive to same-sex couples that have waited for the opportunity to get married. This movie also featured Rob Schneider as an Asian minister that’s extremely stereotypical.

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Cuties (2020)

Cuties (2020)

Cuties is a French movie that hit Netflix, and people weren't happy with the content. It features children in a twerking dance show and sexualizes them.

It's so bad that Capitol Hill has begun an investigation into the movie. We're guessing it won't last much longer on Netflix (and for a good reason). 

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White Chicks (2004)

White Chicks (2004)

White Chicks is about two black detectives who decide to go undercover as two white chicks, hence the title.

The film makes fun of white stereotypes, and those that watch it today know that it couldn’t be remade in the same fashion even if it was funny.

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The Last Samurai (2003)

The Last Samurai (2003)

In this film, Tom Cruise played a washed up, drunk, ex-military who had no purpose in life until he’s taken in by a clan. He then lays himself on the line to preserve the Samurai way of life.

Mhm. Sure. An American is cast in the central role as a savior, and it’s historically inaccurate. It isn’t as bad as some of the others on the list, but it’s still pretty bad.

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Basic Instinct (1992)

Basic Instinct (1992)

Everyone remembers the famous Sharon Stone flash, but there are more reasons this film is incredibly offensive. The portrayal of women and lesbians upset the gay and lesbian community when it released.

Even now, Sharon Stone states that she regrets taking the role and states that the scene wasn’t even supposed to be in the film. She was literally tricked into doing it.

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Love Guru (2008)

Love Guru (2008)

As you can imagine, a movie about a white Canadian portraying an Indian guru of love wasn’t culturally sensitive. For some people, it was so chock-full of Indian caricatures that it was “downright unfunny.”

Along with that, some other issues include the cringy accents, elephant copulation, and Sir Ben Kingsley who plays a guru by the name of “Tugginmypudha.”

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

No one is saying that Breakfast at Tiffany’s was a bad movie. On the contrary, it was pretty good. What wasn’t good was Mickey Rooney’s interpretation of I. Y. Yunioshi. He wore fake teeth and pretended to be a Japanese man in the most offensive way possible.

Yunioshi is also the only non-white character in the whole movie. His scenes could have been easily cut but weren’t for “comedic relief.” 

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Song of the South (1946)

Song of the South (1946)

We all knew that Song of the South was going to be on this list. It’s easily one of Disney’s most racially insensitive pieces. There are many issues with this film, but the worst is the cheerful attitudes about the characters’ social status.

This film is certainly a product of its time, and we’re guessing Disney won’t release the DVD from “The Vault.”

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You Only Live Twice (1967)

You Only Live Twice (1967)

We could list nearly every old James Bond film, but You Only Live Twice is the worst offender. It features James Bond pretending to be Japanese. It’s an extremely racist portrayal that’s only made worse by Sean Connery affixing artificial eyelids, a jet-black toupee, and bushy eyebrows.

Further in the film, you see every Asian stereotype exploited including ninjas, kimonos, and inexplicably provocative women.

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I Spit On Your Grave (1978)

I Spit On Your Grave (1978)

The 70s were a time of sexual expression, and that was pretty clear in their movies. The original I Spit On Your Grave from 1978 had plenty of gore, but that isn’t what lands it on this list. It’s the horrific rape scene that lasts for a ridiculous amount of time, and the second half of the film is filled with sex scenes for revenge.

A remake was made in 2010, but it was just as bad. It was quickly banned in Canada and the United Kingdom. 

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Dumbo (1941)

Dumbo (1941)

Dumbo is a classic Disney movie that has some questionable content. Remember the crows? When the movie was made, racism was still running rampant, but this film couldn't be remade in the same racist way today. The crows represent this as they talk in “jive.”

Even the main crow is named Jim Crow! Disney is planning a remake, but we're guessing the crows won't show up. The crows represent this as they talk in “jive.” Even the main crow is named Jim Crow!

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The Toy (1982)

The Toy (1982)

The Toy wasn’t really a hit in its time despite starring Richard Pryor. Today, we’re guessing that there would be riots due to the premise alone.

It’s about a spoiled white boy who picks out a goofy black guy as his new toy. That’s gonna be a no from me, dawg.

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Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994)

Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994)

Everyone can admit that the second Ace Ventura is leagues ahead of the first. Part of that could have been due to the story.

It’s built around a homophobic and transphobic plotline where the big reveal has Ace scrubbing his mouth after he realized he kissed a transgender woman.

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Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Silence of the Lambs is pretty terrifying, but Buffalo Bill made a lot of people furious. Many people consider the film to be transphobic as Buffalo Bill portrays a transgender woman.

For many, Buffalo Bill was actually the first image of a transgender person to reach popular media, and it reinforced a lot of things that are considered false by the trans community including the fact that being transgender is a choice. 

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Planet of the Apes (1968)

Planet of the Apes (1968)

Planet of the Apes is a classic, but it brings up some pretty stark scenes. Throughout the film, we see light-skinned apes commanding dark-skinned apes that seem, which is pretty reminiscent of another time in history.

Granted, many people see the movie as an allegory about race and politics. 

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Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009)

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009)

The Transformers films aren’t good, but none are worse than Revenge of the Fallen. This is mostly thanks to the two little racist robots Mudflap and Skids. The characters are incredibly racist and fit every stereotype the creators could fit into two characters, including being illiterate and having gold capped bucked teeth.

It only gets worse when you realize that the voice actor is a white guy—Tom Kenny. He’s the same guy that voices SpongeBob SquarePants. Is this the ‘40s?

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The Passion of the Christ (2004)

The Passion of the Christ (2004)

The Passion of the Christ was made by Mel Gibson, a man who isn’t shy about controversy. What made this film such a problem was the amount of suffering, death, violence, and gore. There are ridiculously gruesome torture scenes that make audiences turn away.

It was later accused of anti-Semitism by film critics because Jewish characters are depicted in an “extremely unflattering light,” according to the Anti-Defamation League.

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Bruno (2009)

Bruno (2009)

Sacha Baron Cohen has earned an infamous reputation for his offensive and bizarre films. Bruno took this to a whole new level.

The film received an NC-17 rating due to its obscene sexual scenes and raunchy jokes. Ukraine banned the film completely, and an Austrian ambassador warned the general public to stay away, far away. 

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Dogma (1999)

Dogma (1999)

Kevin Smith was known for his vast usage of inappropriate fart jokes and raunchy innuendos, but Dogma was so offensive it made heads spin and your grandma roll over in her grave.

The film offended the entire Catholic community for its religious satire. 

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The Producers (1967)

The Producers (1967)

"We're marching to a faster pace / Look out, here comes the master race." Mel Brooks released his first directed movie, The  Producers, just two decades after WWII.

The entire movie is centered around a fictional play called Springtime For Hitler, and it's completely cringeworthy. 

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Sausage Party (2016)

Sausage Party (2016)

Sausage Party literally had audiences rolling when it premiered in 2016. The film was highly controversial due to its extreme sexual nature and indiscriminate roasting of every type of person in existence.

If you’re easily offended, this movie is totally not for you. 

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Knocked Up (2007)

Knocked Up (2007)

Knocked Up pokes fun at the extremely sensitive topic of accidental pregnancy.

Seth Rogan’s character, Ben Stone, gets a total wake-up call and loses his party-animal lifestyle as he tries to be a father. 

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