10 Best (and 8 Worst) Kids' Shows for Toddlers main image
Scroll Down To Continue

10 Best (and 8 Worst) Kids' Shows for Toddlers

Best: Peg + Cat

Best: Peg + Cat

Ukulele playing Peg and her ever-helpful Cat solve complex problems with basic math in this cartoon that’s great for all ages. With everything from counting to 100 to understanding pentagons and Albert Einstein to Japanese culture, Peg and her Cat can be entertaining for parents, too. Math aside, the characters make an effort to help each other remember to maintain good behavior. For example, when Peg starts freaking out, Cat kindly reminds her to calm down and look for answers instead of panicking. With a little girl taking the lead in a STEM-based program, it’s the perfect show to encourage your youngest feminist to take control of math problems. 

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Super Why!

Best: Super Why!

Wyatt and his gang of fairytale-based cohorts save the day in a variety of storylines with their amazing literacy skills. Everyone has one really strong talent, and they all have to work together to solve the mystery. Great for phonics, rhyming, vocabulary building, and just learning the alphabet.

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Dinosaur Train

Best: Dinosaur Train

Dinosaur Train stars a pterodactyl family of five, plus their adopted T-Rex. With the help of the Conductor, the family goes on adventures on the Dinosaur Train to different periods of the prehistoric era, meeting new types of dinosaurs and other early earth creatures, appealing to the mini paleontologist in every home.

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Sesame Street

Best: Sesame Street

Jim Henson’s classic Sesame Street has been on since 1969, and it’s no wonder. Some of the original episodes may have had some now-questionable content, but the Muppets have really upped their game. The cast periodically adds new characters, like Julie who sees things differently because she is on the autism spectrum, or Abbe’s step-brother Rudy and their mixed families, which opens up a great realm of topics that can be difficult for kids to understand. Not to mention the standard letter and number of the day which helps children work on counting and phonics through catchy tunes.

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood

Best: Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood

Daniel Tiger has taken over the neighborhood for Mr. Rogers, but all your favorite characters have been incorporated. This classic-based newly revamped cartoon from a preschool tiger’s vantage point help kids figure out all kinds of important lessons, like helping your family, becoming a big sibling, or that being different is okay.

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Llama Llama

Best: Llama Llama

Based on the children’s series, Llama Llama learns why his bad behavior isn’t okay. Mama Llama does her best to guide the little ones under her care to make good choices and be kind to each other. Younger toddlers may have difficulty following longer storylines.

(Image via Pinterest)

Best: Sid the Science Kid

Best: Sid the Science Kid

Claymation Sid wants to know “everything about everything.” and with the help of his classmates and teacher, he’s conquering science one question at a time. Each episode focuses on a different scientific topic -- charts, germs, prisms, etc. -- with help from short non-cartoon clips. This is a great show for introducing little ones to the wonders of the world around them -- and to encourage questions about it.

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Wonder Pets

Best: Wonder Pets

A turtle, a duck, and a guinea pig sing their way through adventures as they attempt to save other animals around the world. The duck’s mild speech impediment can be a little obnoxious for parents -- especially if you’re working on a similar problem with your own kiddo -- but the show’s intentions are good. Aside from teamwork, the Wonder Pets promote being helpful, respecting nature, and accepting change.

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Julie’s Greenroom

Best: Julie’s Greenroom

It’s hard to go wrong with Julie Andrews leading the charge, and she does a beautiful job in this educational show that’s very different from a lot of others on air. Rather than a preview of what you can expect from the schoolroom, Julie’s Greenroom introduces kids to the performance arts. Parents know it’s important to promote literacy and math skills, but it’s important to introduce young kiddos to culture and the arts, as well.

(Image via Facebook)

Best: Dinotrux

Best: Dinotrux

Perhaps the best thing about Dinotrux is what a mixed bag it presents. Although it may not be appropriate for younger toddlers, older kiddos will love the mechanical prehistoric atmosphere of dinosaur trucks. Although that sounds a little weird, the show makes an effort to promote values like friendship and not to make snap judgments.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: Caillou

Worst: Caillou

Caillou is largely regarded as the world’s most obnoxious four-year-old by parents everywhere. He’s hard to listen to, and virtually every episode revolves around his bad behavior. If your toddler isn’t whining enough or could really be a little ruder to his friends, Caillou can show her how it’s done.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: Masha and the Bear

Worst: Masha and the Bear

Based on a Russian folktale, Masha and the Bear appeals to some families -- but for others, Masha’s precocious antics are a run of bad behavior that she expects someone else to deal with. While a frantic Bear tries desperately to fix her mistakes, Masha just keeps on causing trouble.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: Pinkalicious

Worst: Pinkalicious

Pinkalicious is a newer series on PBS with some incredibly interesting artwork behind it. Unfortunately, that’s about as interesting as it gets. While it encourages imaginative play, the show seems to revolve around accidental predicaments that work out no matter what.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: Arthur

Worst: Arthur

Arthur isn’t necessarily the worst show for all kids, but for toddlers, it probably shouldn’t be top of the list. A variety of school-aged characters face their own difficulties and generally manage to learn a good lesson from it in the end. The problem with this for toddlers is the attention span it requires to follow the storyline, and thus understand why the original issue was perhaps less than good behavior.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: Wild Kratts

Worst: Wild Kratts

Wild Kratts follows a pair of brothers into extreme areas of the earth where they learn interesting things about all kinds of animals. For toddlers and preschoolers, however, the methods behind the science can be confusing, since they use wildly unrealistic means to come to conclusions and create costumes that give them the abilities of the subject animal.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: Peppa Pig

Worst: Peppa Pig

The intentions behind Peppa Pig are great; the show focuses on age appropriate issues and learning to be kind and sociable. Unfortunately, while Peppa’s parents do their best to help her solve problems and change bad behaviors, a lot of parents find the character rude and bossy -- and these unflattering characteristics are fun for the younger set to imitate.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: The Backyardigans

Worst: The Backyardigans

The Backyardigans is a great way to promote culture, geography, history, and imagination, but…there is also a widespread tendency for bad behavior and mean-spiritedness, particularly from certain characters. The songs may be catchy, but they don’t always send the best messages. Many parents find some episodes are great, while others should be absolutely avoided.

(Image via Facebook)

Worst: Splash and Bubbles

Worst: Splash and Bubbles

Splash and Bubbles is another series that isn’t necessarily terrible, but it just isn’t quite what you’d hope for it to be. The show kind of gets billed as a look at the mysteries under the sea with a second focus on working together and helping your friends. Unfortunately, the plots tend to be weak and unexciting, making it difficult for younger viewers to stay interested.

(Image via Facebook)